Italian Marinated Mushrooms – Home Canning Recipe

 

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MUSHROOM NUTRITION GUIDE
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Italian Marinated Mushrooms – Home Canning Recipe

Description

Preserving food by canning and drying is making a comeback. It was once a necessity and is now a hobby – most notably millennials are interested in home preserving. Research conducted on behalf of the Ball brand canning line determined that nearly half of all millennials (49 percent) are interested in canning because they love cooking and canning seems fun (38 percent). This research also found that 68 percent of Americans would rather make their own fresh foods than purchase store bought.

Monterey Mushrooms is no stranger to canning mushrooms. We’ve been canning mushrooms since the 1983. We specialize in marinated mushrooms-- our Italian, garlic and teriyaki recipes are our most popular. Seeing the slow food movement and home preservation trend encouraged us to come up with a home canning recipe for our mushroom fans who prefer to DIY.

This simple Italian recipe is great for beginners as well as experienced veterans. We looked to Ball for advice on home canning techniques since our primary experience is with industrial equipment and large batch sizes.


Ingredients

Italian Marinated Mushrooms Ingredients:

  • 6 lbs whole mushrooms (1”-1-1/4” cap diameter)
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1 tsp citric acid
  • 2 cups extra virgin olive oil
  • 2-1/2 cups white vinegar (5%)
  • 1 tbsp dried thyme leaves
  • 1 tbsp dried basil leaves
  • 1 tbsp canning/pickling salt
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onions
  • 1/4 cup finely diced bell peppers
  • 4 cloves garlic, cut in quarters
  • 25 black peppercorns

Instructions

How to Make Marinated Mushrooms:

  1. Prepare mushrooms: Select fresh unopened mushrooms with caps around 1 to 1-1/4 inch in diameter. If you’re canning larger mushrooms, halve or quarter them. Cut stems, leaving about a 1/4 inch. Wash in a colander to remove any soil from caps.
  2. Cook mushrooms: Place washed mushrooms in a large stainless steel or enameled pot. Cover with 1-1/2 gallons of filtered water. Add lemon juice and citric acid. Ensure the water is enough to cover the mushrooms. Note: Mushrooms will float to the top so notice when they start rising and stop adding water. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer for 5 minutes. Drain.
  3. Make Italian marinade: Mix olive oil, vinegar, onions, bell peppers, thyme, basil, and salt in a medium saucepan or pot. Bring mixture to a boil and then turn off.
  4. Filling jars: Fill sterilized jars with 3-5 peppercorns and a ¼ clove of garlic. Next, fill jars with cooked mushrooms, leaving 1 1/2 inches of space at the top. Ladle Italian marinade into jars, leaving ½” headspace.
  5. Processing: We recommend a processing time of 20 minutes for elevations of 1,000 ft or less. Increase time as needed for your altitude.  

Process in water bath as recommended by Ball:

 

Water Bath Canning Instructions:

  1. READ through recipe and instructions. Assemble equipment and ingredients. Follow guidelines for recipe preparation, jar size, preserving method and processing time.
  2. CHECK jars, lids and bands for proper functioning. Jars with nicks, cracks, uneven rims or sharp edges may prevent sealing or cause jar breakage. The underside of lids should not have scratches or uneven or incomplete sealing compound as this may prevent sealing. Bands should fit on jars. Wash jars, lids and bands in hot, soapy water. Rinse well. Dry bands.
  3. HEAT home canning jars in hot water, not boiling, until ready for use. Fill a large saucepan or stockpot half-way with water. Place jars in water (filling jars with water from the saucepan will prevent flotation). Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Keep jars hot until ready for use. You may also use a dishwasher to wash and heat jars. Keeping jars hot prevents them from breaking when hot food is added. Leave lids and bands at room temperature for easy handling.
  4. PREPARE boiling water bath canner by filling half-full with water and keep water at a simmer while covered with lid until jars are filled and placed in canner. Be sure your rack in resting on the rim of the canner or on the bottom, depending on the type of rack you are using. You don’t necessarily need to purchase a boiling water bath canner if you don’t already have one at home. Most kitchens have pots that can double as boiling water bath canners. A boiling water bath canner is simply a large, deep saucepot equipped with a lid and a rack. The pot must be large enough to fully surround and immerse the jars in water by 1 to 2 inches and allow for the water to boil rapidly with the lid on. If you don’t have a rack designed for home preserving, use a cake cooling rack or extra bands tied together to cover the bottom of the pot.
  5. PREPARE tested preserving recipe using fresh produce and other quality ingredients.
  6. REMOVE hot jar from hot water, using a Jar Lifter, emptying water inside jar. Fill jar one at a time with prepared food using a Jar Funnel leaving headspace recommended in recipe (1/4 inch for soft spreads such as jams and jellies and fruit juices; 1/2 inch for fruits, pickles, salsa, sauces, and tomatoes). Remove air bubbles, if stated in recipe, by sliding the Bubble Remover & Headspace Tool or rubber spatula between the jar and food to release trapped air and ensure proper headspace during processing. Repeat around jar 2 to 3 times.
  7. CLEAN mason jar rim and threads of jar using a clean, damp cloth to remove any food residue. Center lid on jar allowing sealing compound to come in contact with the jar rim. Apply band and adjust until fit is fingertip tight. Place filled jars in canner until recipe is used or canner is full. Lower rack with jars into water. Make sure water covers jars by 1 to 2 inches.
  8. PLACE lid on water bath canner. Bring water to a full rolling boil. Begin processing time.
  9. PROCESS jars in the boiling water for the processing time indicated in tested preserving recipe, adjusting for altitude ( see altitude chart). When processing time is complete, turn off the heat and remove the canner lid. Allow jars to stand in canner for 5 minutes to get acclimated to the outside temperature.
  10. REMOVE jars from canner and set upright on a towel to prevent jar breakage that can occur from temperature differences. Leave jars undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Bands should not be retightened as this may interfere with the sealing process.
  11. CHECK jar lids for seals. Lids should not flex up and down when center is pressed. Remove bands. Try to lift lids off with your fingertips. If the lid cannot be lifted off, the lid has a good seal. If a lid does not seal within 24 hours, the product can be immediately reprocessed or refrigerated. Clean mason jars and lids. Label and share then store in a cool, dry, dark place up to 1 year.
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Monterey Mushrooms blue and white logo

Italian Marinated Mushrooms – Home Canning Recipe


Description

Preserving food by canning and drying is making a comeback. It was once a necessity and is now a hobby – most notably millennials are interested in home preserving. Research conducted on behalf of the Ball brand canning line determined that nearly half of all millennials (49 percent) are interested in canning because they love cooking and canning seems fun (38 percent). This research also found that 68 percent of Americans would rather make their own fresh foods than purchase store bought.

Monterey Mushrooms is no stranger to canning mushrooms. We’ve been canning mushrooms since the 1983. We specialize in marinated mushrooms-- our Italian, garlic and teriyaki recipes are our most popular. Seeing the slow food movement and home preservation trend encouraged us to come up with a home canning recipe for our mushroom fans who prefer to DIY.

This simple Italian recipe is great for beginners as well as experienced veterans. We looked to Ball for advice on home canning techniques since our primary experience is with industrial equipment and large batch sizes.


Ingredients

Italian Marinated Mushrooms Ingredients:

  • 6 lbs whole mushrooms (1”-1-1/4” cap diameter)
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1 tsp citric acid
  • 2 cups extra virgin olive oil
  • 2-1/2 cups white vinegar (5%)
  • 1 tbsp dried thyme leaves
  • 1 tbsp dried basil leaves
  • 1 tbsp canning/pickling salt
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onions
  • 1/4 cup finely diced bell peppers
  • 4 cloves garlic, cut in quarters
  • 25 black peppercorns

Instructions

How to Make Marinated Mushrooms:

  1. Prepare mushrooms: Select fresh unopened mushrooms with caps around 1 to 1-1/4 inch in diameter. If you’re canning larger mushrooms, halve or quarter them. Cut stems, leaving about a 1/4 inch. Wash in a colander to remove any soil from caps.
  2. Cook mushrooms: Place washed mushrooms in a large stainless steel or enameled pot. Cover with 1-1/2 gallons of filtered water. Add lemon juice and citric acid. Ensure the water is enough to cover the mushrooms. Note: Mushrooms will float to the top so notice when they start rising and stop adding water. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer for 5 minutes. Drain.
  3. Make Italian marinade: Mix olive oil, vinegar, onions, bell peppers, thyme, basil, and salt in a medium saucepan or pot. Bring mixture to a boil and then turn off.
  4. Filling jars: Fill sterilized jars with 3-5 peppercorns and a ¼ clove of garlic. Next, fill jars with cooked mushrooms, leaving 1 1/2 inches of space at the top. Ladle Italian marinade into jars, leaving ½” headspace.
  5. Processing: We recommend a processing time of 20 minutes for elevations of 1,000 ft or less. Increase time as needed for your altitude.  

Process in water bath as recommended by Ball:

 

Water Bath Canning Instructions:

  1. READ through recipe and instructions. Assemble equipment and ingredients. Follow guidelines for recipe preparation, jar size, preserving method and processing time.
  2. CHECK jars, lids and bands for proper functioning. Jars with nicks, cracks, uneven rims or sharp edges may prevent sealing or cause jar breakage. The underside of lids should not have scratches or uneven or incomplete sealing compound as this may prevent sealing. Bands should fit on jars. Wash jars, lids and bands in hot, soapy water. Rinse well. Dry bands.
  3. HEAT home canning jars in hot water, not boiling, until ready for use. Fill a large saucepan or stockpot half-way with water. Place jars in water (filling jars with water from the saucepan will prevent flotation). Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Keep jars hot until ready for use. You may also use a dishwasher to wash and heat jars. Keeping jars hot prevents them from breaking when hot food is added. Leave lids and bands at room temperature for easy handling.
  4. PREPARE boiling water bath canner by filling half-full with water and keep water at a simmer while covered with lid until jars are filled and placed in canner. Be sure your rack in resting on the rim of the canner or on the bottom, depending on the type of rack you are using. You don’t necessarily need to purchase a boiling water bath canner if you don’t already have one at home. Most kitchens have pots that can double as boiling water bath canners. A boiling water bath canner is simply a large, deep saucepot equipped with a lid and a rack. The pot must be large enough to fully surround and immerse the jars in water by 1 to 2 inches and allow for the water to boil rapidly with the lid on. If you don’t have a rack designed for home preserving, use a cake cooling rack or extra bands tied together to cover the bottom of the pot.
  5. PREPARE tested preserving recipe using fresh produce and other quality ingredients.
  6. REMOVE hot jar from hot water, using a Jar Lifter, emptying water inside jar. Fill jar one at a time with prepared food using a Jar Funnel leaving headspace recommended in recipe (1/4 inch for soft spreads such as jams and jellies and fruit juices; 1/2 inch for fruits, pickles, salsa, sauces, and tomatoes). Remove air bubbles, if stated in recipe, by sliding the Bubble Remover & Headspace Tool or rubber spatula between the jar and food to release trapped air and ensure proper headspace during processing. Repeat around jar 2 to 3 times.
  7. CLEAN mason jar rim and threads of jar using a clean, damp cloth to remove any food residue. Center lid on jar allowing sealing compound to come in contact with the jar rim. Apply band and adjust until fit is fingertip tight. Place filled jars in canner until recipe is used or canner is full. Lower rack with jars into water. Make sure water covers jars by 1 to 2 inches.
  8. PLACE lid on water bath canner. Bring water to a full rolling boil. Begin processing time.
  9. PROCESS jars in the boiling water for the processing time indicated in tested preserving recipe, adjusting for altitude ( see altitude chart). When processing time is complete, turn off the heat and remove the canner lid. Allow jars to stand in canner for 5 minutes to get acclimated to the outside temperature.
  10. REMOVE jars from canner and set upright on a towel to prevent jar breakage that can occur from temperature differences. Leave jars undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Bands should not be retightened as this may interfere with the sealing process.
  11. CHECK jar lids for seals. Lids should not flex up and down when center is pressed. Remove bands. Try to lift lids off with your fingertips. If the lid cannot be lifted off, the lid has a good seal. If a lid does not seal within 24 hours, the product can be immediately reprocessed or refrigerated. Clean mason jars and lids. Label and share then store in a cool, dry, dark place up to 1 year.

About Author

Lindsey Roberts
Lindsey Roberts

I love produce and mushrooms in particular! I started at Monterey Mushrooms in 2010 working in quality assurance and food safety. In 2013, I participated in a year-long grower training program to learn the art and science of growing mushrooms. I spent the next year growing mushrooms, and after the honeymoon phase was over, I realized my real passion was marketing. Mushrooms are one of the most difficult crops to grow, yet one of the easiest to use. I love cooking with mushrooms and teaching other people how to cook with them too. I’m a DIY, home improvement, gardening and landscaping fanatic! I find it rewarding to transform my home into my own personal refuge. I enjoy waking up to an indoor cycling ride while watching the morning news; and in the evening I find it gratifying to unwind with yoga.